What You Should Know From UN World Water Week

28 Aug 2019

Category: Company News

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This week in August marks the United Nations (UN) World Water Week. 

Starting from Sunday 25th August to Friday 30th August 2019, leaders from around the world,  come together to discuss a wide range of the world’s water issues. Covering water development and sustainability. Key concerns are also raised around the environmental challenges that face our global supply of water. 

Held each year in Sweden, this global water conference is led by the Stockholm International Water Institute. The conference is a focal point for all those involved in global water issues. 

World Water Week has now been running for 29 years. The annual conference marks a significant time in the year when water challenges are faced head-on. 

As the largest water conference in the world, leaders, experts, decision-makers and business innovators from a range of sectors and countries, attend the event to exchange new ideas on how we can solve the problems facing our water supply. 

So far this year the event has seen 3,701 participants, 1,196 organisations, and 127 countries attend the conference.

As a platform for water issues globally, it highlights some of the most recent studies and reports. This provides a deep level of insight into the water challenges nations and cultures are facing.

Water As A Solution

Every year the UN World Water Week has a theme, which ensures specific concerns are addressed. This year the theme is “Water for Society: Including All.” 

This year’s World Water Week aims to build awareness of water and its impacts on our society. 

Executive Director of Stockholm International Water Institute, Torgny Holmgren highlighted the importance of using water to solve global challenges. He raised this in his opening speech of Water Week. 

“Many in our societies are not aware of the vital role that waters play in realising prosperity, eradicating poverty and tackling the climate crisis.”

Water Concerns Raised 

During World Water Week speakers from across the globe highlight their concerns around water. These are vast and varied, and often dependent on nationality and culture. Each person addresses an aspect of water which many may not have considered. 

So far, these include the following issues; 

  • 70 million refugees are currently without a home. Yet these people lack basic water needs in regards to sanitation and fresh water supply. Achieving safe water and sanitation services in refugee camps is an enormous challenge. However financing is one of the main obstacles. 
  • For many indigenous people, water is a sacred element and holds a central place in culture and traditions. From research, statistics reveal that indigenous people around the world suffer disproportionately from access to water and sanitation. 
  • The production of Asparagus in Peru has caused a severe water crisis on small farms. The demands of the product have meant small-scale farmers have had to abandon land because wells are drying up. This lack of water causes health problems within the community and increases local conflicts over the scarce water supply. 

 

The UN World Water Week provides us with a picture of the concerns nations face around the globe when it comes to water. While we may focus on our national problems with water, there are vast issues that need to be addressed to ensure water can help everyone around the world to prosper.